Nostalgia Overload: Watch These Five Classic Cartoons For Throwback Thursday

Oh, so everything (in the entire world) was a thousand times more amazing when you were younger? That’s cute. But it’s also increeeedibly uninteresting. You know, the tear-jerking, remorseful preaching from someone clinging tightly onto something that they shouldn’tlike Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction. Let it slide, girl. I mean, did that pet rabbit really have to die boiling? Glenn, let’s not boil bunnies and move on.

Now I don’t wanna be that guy who glamorises the past disgustingly, but I do think it’s vital we pay homage and pour a cup of nostalgia when it comes to animated cartoons. You know, especially with the ADHD-infected stuff that’s being put on TV for kids these days (why, parents/broadcasters?—why?).

Anyways, with the limited technology available in the 30s and 40s, it still amazes me how creatively humor, culture and political issues were being brought to the animated screen. So, I decided to put together a list of classic cartoons on Viewster for you guys.

Which are your favorites? Are we missing any on Viewster, and why? Drop a comment below.

Yes, those are bees. Sh*tloads of bees.

 Popeye

Back in the day, Popeye was nothing but another fling for Olive Oyl. He didn’t really have anything going on for him except for a funky way of talking and seriously witty behaviour. However soon the tables turned, the original Olive Oyl comic strip was renamed Popeye and soon enough he was on the big screen, devouring ridiculous amounts of Spinach in order to: 1) mess up Bluto, and 2) achieve sexy time with Olivia.

Don’t miss episode nine—turns out spinach is the answer to any problem. Also the opening scene has got to be the best visualisation of heavy snoring. Ever.

 

Someone manufacture and sell this drink, already. Please.

Betty Boop

Perhaps the most iconic “flapper” of the jazz age, possibly one of the most acclaimed cartoon characters in the world and almost definitely the most famous sex symbol on the animated screen, Betty Boop (and her curvy figure) quickly won the hearts of millions of people around the world. And for good reason: The image of a carefree, sexual female symbol during The Great Depression attracted a huge adult audience looking to be reminded of the previous, roaring decade. We collected the first and most famous Betty Boop cartoons here.

 

Daffy Duck
What every boxing ring corner should look like.

 Daffy Duck

With apologies to Bugs Bunny, we also need to give a few seconds of stage time to his arch rival, Daffy Duck. As opposed to the more everyday-like characters of Betty Boop and Popeye, the manic and predictable bird was one of the first screwball cartoon characters developed by Warner Brothers in the ‘30s. As his popularity grew from the initial, short guest appearances on Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, his identity did get slightly more depth while maintaing the lovely, neurotic and competitive aspects that we came to love.

 

"WTF!!!???"
“WTF!!!???”

Casper

Turns out, being a little ghost boy is a hard knock life. It’s lonely. People have near-death experiences when you greet them. That sort of thing. But luckily, with enough hard work, you do make friends—and that’s what Casper is all about. He cleverly depicted the feeling of loneliness that almost every kid has experienced at times, all while maintaining the most good-hearted and mellow charisma possible for a ghostly dude. Based on a 1939 children’s book, Casper appeared on the big screen in 1945 with this series, and went on to become one of the most famous characters from Famous Studios, as seen in the many cartoons and the 1995 feature film, following his debut.

 

Left hook ensues.
Left hook ensues.

Superman

I sort of saved the best for last. (In my opinion, at least). With the 1940’s Superman cartoon series, Fleischer Studios and Famous Studios created an amazing depiction of American culture and history that will live on for a loooong time (it’s more alive than ever right now, actually). First of all, he’s the Man of Steel and he saves the world in the most awesome ways, but the 17 episodes take things to another level if you watch it with an eye for the portrayal of architecture, fashion, politics and so on. Maybe it’s my nostalgia overload talking, so I’ll cut this off here.

(But, really: “Faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!” … What more could you ask for?)

 

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